Using technology to share cultural treasures – part two

So, the bust of Nefertiti I replicated last week has been a hit.  People love being able to see and touch a piece of the past in their hands, even if it’s not the real thing.  To me, though I didn’t create the scan of Nefertiti, I feel like I’m playing a part in bringing the past back to life, and I love it!  The Lulzbot Taz does a great job making the replicas.  As I mentioned last week, I’m not usually a fan of extruder printers, but I’d have to say the quality this thing can output, not to speak of its excellent reliability, has really won me over.

While I’d thought of running a larger replica of Nefertiti, I decided to make something new. The Smithsonian has nice little collection of scans available for download, though it’s a bit complicated to access them, unfortunately. I chose the funerary relief sculpture of a Palmyran woman Haliphat, dating to 231 AD.  Palmyra was a Romanized city in Syria, mixing elements of Roman culture with Aramaic culture.  Palmyra has, as you may know, has seen destruction of priceless cultural treasures by Daish/ISIL.  Daish seems to see itself as erasing the pre-Islamic past of Syria, much like the Taliban did in Afghanistan.  The good news for Haliphat is that she is safe within the Smithsonian.  Regardless of your views on repatriation of cultural treasures, this is clearly not the time to be returning artifacts to Syria.

[fusion_builder_container hundred_percent=”yes” overflow=”visible”][fusion_builder_row][fusion_builder_column type=”1_1″ background_position=”left top” background_color=”” border_size=”” border_color=”” border_style=”solid” spacing=”yes” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” padding=”” margin_top=”0px” margin_bottom=”0px” class=”” id=”” animation_type=”” animation_speed=”0.3″ animation_direction=”left” hide_on_mobile=”no” center_content=”no” min_height=”none”]

Source: Smithsonian – http://newsdesk.si.edu/photos/palmyra-syria-haliphat

Again, I decided to use our Lulzbot Taz, as it gave such great results with Nefertiti.  This time, though, since I knew I was going to be painting Haliphat white, I decided to just use the clear/natural PLA filament, and save the luminous blue for those who actually want it to glow in the dark.

The Lulzbot again did a fantastic job!  If anything, I feel like it did a cleaner job on Haliphat.  If there’s a catch, it that the natural PLA filament is too shiny and sparkly to really show the detail we’d want in an artifact reproduction.  The good news is that a little white acrylic paint will bring all that detail right back!

While the Smithsonian’s scan of Haliphat was very good, Nelles and al Badri’s guerilla scan of Nefertiti seems to show a lot more fine detail.  Whether this is due to a decision by the Smithsonian to limit the resolution of the scans in their online collection, or inferior scanning technique, I wouldn’t know.  Although the Lulzbot does great work, it’s not capable of showing much difference in detail between the two scans.  For that, I think we’d need to go to a more sophisticated powder-based printer, like our Z-Corps.

 

[/fusion_builder_column][fusion_builder_column type=”1_1″ background_position=”left top” background_color=”” border_size=”” border_color=”” border_style=”solid” spacing=”yes” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” padding=”” margin_top=”0px” margin_bottom=”0px” class=”” id=”” animation_type=”” animation_speed=”0.3″ animation_direction=”left” hide_on_mobile=”no” center_content=”no” min_height=”none”]

STAY TUNED FOR AN UPDATE WITH THE PAINTED VERSION![/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]